AGING ALTERNATIVES' NEWSLETTER

January, 2019

Person Direct Care

Dear friends, welcome to Aging Alternatives' website and the first edition of our newsletter.  This addition seeks to provide the reader with information on an extremely important topic:  ELDER ABUSE. We at Aging Alternatives hope that you will find the information useful.  Please accept our best wishes for a happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!!

ALWAYS BE MINDFUL OF ELDER ABUSE

Unfortunately, according to the Alzheimer'd Association, elder abuse can occur anywhere, particularly in care settings. People with dementia are especially vulnerable since the disease may prevent them from reporting the abuse or even recognizing it as such. 

Let's begin by viewing the following highly instructive video just presenting an overview of how to recognize elder abuse and some thoughts on how and why it is sadly occurring.  The source of the video is Moran Elder Law first published on YouTube 0n Jan 25, 2016

Abuse Types

As overviewed in the video, abuse can take many forms:

  • Physical: causing physical pain or injury

  • Emotional: verbal assaults, threats of abuse, harassment and intimidation

  • Neglect: failure to provide necessities, including food, clothing, shelter, medical care or a safe environment

  • Confinement: restraining or isolating the person

  • Financial: the misuse or withholding of the person's financial resources (money, property) to his or her disadvantage or the advantage of someone else

  • Sexual abuse: touching, fondling or any sexual activity when the person is unable to understand, unwilling to consent, threatened or physically forced

  • Willful deprivation: willfully denying the person medication, medical care, food, shelter or physical assistance, and thereby exposing the individual with Alzheimer's to the risk of physical, mental or emotional harm

  • Self neglect: Due to lack of insight and cognitive changes, a person with Alzheimer's may be unable to safely and adequately provide for day-to-day needs, and may be at risk for harm, falls, wandering and/or malnutrition.

Abuse Types

As overviewed in the video, abuse can take many forms:

  • Physical: causing physical pain or injury

  • Emotional: verbal assaults, threats of abuse, harassment and intimidation

  • Neglect: failure to provide necessities, including food, clothing, shelter, medical care or a safe environment

  • Confinement: restraining or isolating the person

  • Financial: the misuse or withholding of the person's financial resources (money, property) to his or her disadvantage or the advantage of someone else

  • Sexual abuse: touching, fondling or any sexual activity when the person is unable to understand, unwilling to consent, threatened or physically forced

  • Willful deprivation: willfully denying the person medication, medical care, food, shelter or physical assistance, and thereby exposing the individual with Alzheimer's to the risk of physical, mental or emotional harm

  • Self neglect: Due to lack of insight and cognitive changes, a person with Alzheimer's may be unable to safely and adequately provide for day-to-day needs, and may be at risk for harm, falls, wandering and/or malnutrition.

Know your rights

If you or someone you care for is living in a care facility, you should be aware of a resident’s rights to quality care. By educating yourself, you can monitor the level of care at the facility and, should a problem arise, know when to speak up and take action. The following information will help you learn about the rights and how to document problems, communicate effectively and find outside resources if necessary. A resident’s rights If a person cannot exercise his or her rights, someone else must act to protect them. A person in residential care has the right to: 

 

  • Get information

  • Participate in care

  • Make choices

  • Voice complaints

  • Be treated with dignity and respect in privacy and confidentiality

  • Have possessions stored securely.

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Time is always of the essence --  one only has a short time-frame to take action.  It may be most optimm to leave one facility and transfer to another after you have performed the necessary research.

Need more information?

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Call us at (412) 387-6001

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